NLP Technique: Perfectionism Addiction

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Perfectionism Addiction Technique? Say what? Is that even a thing? Do you often start to feel that rising sense of anxiety, knowing something is not quite perfect yet? Then please join Perfectionism Anonymous. This is where all of us can gather to complain about our critical parents and our superior siblings.

As an NLP Trainer, this post is multi-purpose for me, as I am also a recovering perfectionist.
As a recovering perfectionist, I have learned the following:

  • If you wait to be perfect, you will never get started.
  • It is an illusion that perfection is equal to mastery.
  • Mastery can only be achieved through effort and failure.
  • Perfection is boring.
  • Perfectionism in one part of your life ultimately screw up another part of your life.
  • Your perfectionism shouldn’t be benefitting your boss or anyone who doesn’t deserve it.

Have you ever noticed that perfection is often subjective and not seen or notice by others? Few people probably really care. Scientific study has shown that 1: it takes 30% of your time to be 70% perfect, and 2: it takes 70% extra time to reach 100% perfection.
Now let that sink in for a moment.
Here is my perfectionism technique:

  1. Download this life wheel (if you want more amazing forms go here).
  2. In what specific part is your perfectionism thriving, taking away your energy and attention? Reflect.
  3. How specifically does that impact the rest of your life wheel?
  4. Who specifically notices the perfect output? Who specifically benefits? Do you (be honest)?
  5. Is it worth what it takes in relation to the rest of the life wheel?
  6. What, specifically, should you do differently to achieve this? Reflect.
Visualize:

What would you see, hear, and feel, when your life wheel is served as a whole? How would this benefit your life?

Consider:

What or who, specifically, could get in the way of achieving this? Consider what actions you will take.

Visualize:

Visualize yourself taking these actions. What would you see, hear, and feel?

Consider:

What, or who, else would benefit from letting go of your perfectionism? What is it that you could be or do instead?

Visualize:

Once again, imagine what you would see, hear, and feel the most when you let go of your perfectionism and decide to work on your life wheel as a whole.

For serious installations in childhoods of perfectionism, I would explore hiring an NLP Master Practitioner Coach to design an NLP technique for you.

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