A Multidisciplinary Approach to NLP Coaching

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If you followed your training with Global NLP Training you probably heard Nicole (or one of her trainers) often say “When in doubt, refer out.” A very sound advice.
As an NLP coach you are pretty all rounded and your potential client outreach is immense. However there will be times when the needs of your client exceed what you are able to offer them. These needs and your ability to meet them should be your main focus and if that means your client finding a more suited professional, then don’t hesitate to help them do so. Recognizing your limitations will only serve to make you a better coach in the long run.

There is however another option. Say, for example, you have a client who is struggling with issues that you feel would benefit from the input of a psychotherapist and you also see elements of NLP that would work well for this client, you could consider joining forces with a psychotherapist for one or more sessions.

The benefits for the client are huge when two professionals, each coming from their own field of expertise, align their resources and work together toward one solution. The departure points will be different, the people approach might be different but the end result can be all the more stronger.

What should you bear in mind when considering teaming up with another professional?
– First and foremost it’s essential you have rapport. Building a network of people around you who have the same work ethic as you and whom you feel comfortable with will be of great advantage when you want to call on them at a later date.
– Mutual respect for each other as individuals and as professionals is not only hugely important, it will also make working together more comfortable and fruitful for you both and in turn put your client at ease.
– Trust in the ability and capacity of the other is a pre and another good reason for building a network around you for future use.
– You have to share the desire to work together toward one clear goal; the well being of your client.
– The ability to switch perceptual positions will be of great help when it comes to overseeing the session and keeping everyone and everything on track.

A multidisciplinary appoach to coaching The rapport, mutual trust and respect you have already built with the person whom you are looking to introduce into your coaching session(s) will trickle down to your client, making it easier for them to feel at ease and to open up in the new situation.

So what are the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach?
– Having already formed a relationship with you it will be a lot easier for your client to be able to continue along the same path without having to start over with someone else on their own.
– The client has the best of both worlds; with each bringing their knowledge from their own area of expertise the client receives a broader view of the situation.
– Working together as a team it’s likely you will come to a more solid, workable solution for your client than when you try to go it alone.
– It’s always good to be able to bounce your idea’s off someone else, it can bring new insights which you may not have otherwise come to.
– Two professionals agreed on a single course of action will always have more persuasive powers than one.

The down side to a multidisciplinary approach could obviously be the double costs the client would have to incur, however the chance that the amount of coaching sessions that your client needs can be seriously reduced because of a more well suited approach.

Knowing your limitations as a coach is an admirable trait and should never be confused with failure. Failure would be selling your client too short by holding onto them when you know that another form of help would be more well suited to them.

When you consider the knowledge you acquired during your NLP training as a tool box filled with your work instruments, imagine how beneficial it would be if someone brought along their own toolbox and you were able to combine the two to come to an amazing result. So in conclusion I’d like to add to Nicole’s saying “When in doubt, refer out” with “and sometimes consider inviting in.”

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